The CAFC Vacated a PTAB Finding of Obviousness Because, By Providing an Overly Broad Constructions, the PTAB Read Key Limitations out of the Claims

Los Angeles Biomedical v. Eli Lilly (2016-1518), February 28, 2017.  Before Judges Newman (concurring-in part and dissenting-in-part), Bryson, and Moore. Takeaway: The PTAB’s overly-broad claim constructions resulted in a decision that lacked the necessary factual support needed to find the claims unpatentable as being obvious under the narrower CAFC constructions. …

When the Examiner Agrees With an Attorney’s Argument Presented in an Inter Partes Reexamination, But Cites to No Substantial Evidence, There is no Factual Basis for the Examiner’s Finding That Patent Claims are Unpatentable as Being

Icon Health v. Strava, (2016-1475) February 27, 2017.  Before Judges O’Malley (concurring-in part and dissenting-in-part), Reyna, and Wallach. Takeaway: In order to withstand a challenge on appeal, a determination by the PTAB that the claims of a patent would have been obvious must be supported by substantial evidence, and be …

Federal Circuit Orders Google Patent Case Transferred from E.D. Tex.

IN RE GOOGLE: Feb. 21, 2017. Before Prost, Lourie, and Linn (dissenting). Takeaway: On a motion to transfer, the existence of related, co-pending litigations does not automatically outweigh all other factors and considerations in the transfer analysis. Procedural Posture: Google petitioned the CAFC for a writ of mandamus following denial …

Web Page Authentication Patent is Outside the Scope of CBM Review

SECURE AXCESS v. PNC BANK: Feb. 21, 2017. Before Lourie (dissenting), Plager, and Taranto. Takeaway: To qualify for CBM review, a patent must claim “the practice, administration, or management of a financial product or service.” Claims that are only “incidental to a financial activity” do not qualify. Procedural Posture: Secure …

Obviousness Rejections Must Articulate Rationale To Support a “Common Sense” Motivation To Combine References

  IN RE VAN OS: Jan. 3, 2017. Before Newman (concurring in part and dissenting in part), Moore, and Wallach. Takeaway: Obviousness findings grounded in “common sense” must contain explicit and clear reasoning providing some rational underpinning why common sense compels a finding of obviousness. Procedural Posture: Marcel Van Os …